In Iraq, Afghanistan, Vietnam, World War II and other wars, the United States
has taken men and women into military service and sent them to war. In so
doing it took upon itself moral and legal obligations of the most serious nature.
But the United States has not fulfilled its duties. It has breached its
contract with the men and women who risked—and sometimes ruined—their
lives in service to their country.
images-300x168
The federal government has responded to the needs of veterans primarily
through the Department of Veterans Affairs (previously called the Veterans
Administration, in both cases referred to as “the VA”).
Although the VA has always provided vast amounts of assistance to veterans
and has even taken some innovative steps to deal with the distinct
problems of the veterans of the current wars and Vietnam, respectively, it has
not done enough. Many vets say VA assistance has been too little and too late.
Too many VA staff members are insensitive to the special needs of certain
vets. As of this writing, the VA has a claims backlog of some 600,000 and
takes about 180 days to process claims. The VA has become known for inaction,
extreme delay and regulations that even lawyers sometimes cannot
understand.
For example, it takes approximately four months to process a simple claim
for educational benefits leaving the vet to live off credit cards or loans from
family. This is less than for more complicated claims, but it’s still far too long.
In many instances over the past 15 years, Guard and Reservists were given inaccurate
information about their eligibility for educational entitlements.
In addition to the federal Veterans Administration, there is a veterans department
in almost every state. Among other things, the job of these
departments is to assist veterans and their families with VA claims. State agencies
vary in size, facilities and quality.

army372-300x155 (1)

Religious leaders lay on the ground and pray over a bible and a copy of the verdict on President Barack Obama's signature healthcare overhaul law outside the Supreme Court in Washington June 28, 2012. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Barack Obama's healthcare law on Thursday in an election-year triumph for him and fellow Democrats and a stinging setback for Republican opponents of the most sweeping overhaul of the unwieldy U.S. healthcare system in about a half century.  REUTERS/Jason Reed  (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH RELIGION)

Religious leaders lay on the ground and pray over a bible and a copy of the verdict on President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare overhaul law outside the Supreme Court in Washington June 28, 2012. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Barack Obama’s healthcare law on Thursday in an election-year triumph for him and fellow Democrats and a stinging setback for Republican opponents of the most sweeping overhaul of the unwieldy U.S. healthcare system in about a half century. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES – Tags: POLITICS HEALTH RELIGION)

size0-300x199